This second image is of a carving I made in 2011. The next is also ebony and dates 2014. Together they represent a large group of work informed by my time while in the construction industry. These pieces are carved from a West African wood called Gabon ebony, one of the few kinds of trees that are jet black. Diospyros Classiflora, as it’s termed in Latin, has a long history of use. Carved pieces have been found in ancient Egyptian tombs, and it is believed to have magical properties.  As a result of unsustainable harvesting many species of this exotic wood are now considered threatened. The ability to make and use tools dates back between 2 and three million years and caused revolutionary leaps in social evolution. As a result of unsustainable harvesting many species of this exotic wood are now considered threatened. The ability to make and use tools dates back between two and three million years and caused revolutionary leaps in social evolution.

This second image is of a carving I made in 2011. The next is also ebony and dates 2014. Together they represent a large group of work informed by my time while in the construction industry. These pieces are carved from a West African wood called Gabon ebony, one of the few kinds of trees that are jet black. Diospyros Classiflora, as it’s termed in Latin, has a long history of use. Carved pieces have been found in ancient Egyptian tombs, and it is believed to have magical properties.  As a result of unsustainable harvesting many species of this exotic wood are now considered threatened. The ability to make and use tools dates back between 2 and three million years and caused revolutionary leaps in social evolution. As a result of unsustainable harvesting many species of this exotic wood are now considered threatened. The ability to make and use tools dates back between two and three million years and caused revolutionary leaps in social evolution.

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Pictured here are various tools I might use when shaping wood. There is a Shinto Japanese rasp, various sharp chisels. Also, I use a pattern maker's vice.

Pictured here are various tools I might use when shaping wood. There is a Shinto Japanese rasp, various sharp chisels. Also, I use a pattern maker's vice.

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I’ve been trying to move on from using tools as subject matter, but it is like my shadow, I can’t escape it. This sculpture I just finished. Here it is in process. The axe and stump that it is lodged into are all one. I like it because the axe is now activated in the base of the work, which feels like a new level.

I’ve been trying to move on from using tools as subject matter, but it is like my shadow, I can’t escape it. This sculpture I just finished. Here it is in process. The axe and stump that it is lodged into are all one. I like it because the axe is now activated in the base of the work, which feels like a new level.

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I worked from nude models. 

I worked from nude models. 

“If there is a tree in the country I don’t bring it into my lab to look at it under a microscope , because I think the wind which blows through the leaves is absolutely necessary for the knowledge of the tree and cannot be separated from it...” Jean Debuffet  

“If there is a tree in the country I don’t bring it into my lab to look at it under a microscope , because I think the wind which blows through the leaves is absolutely necessary for the knowledge of the tree and cannot be separated from it...” Jean Debuffet

 

This sculpture, is carved out of Maple Burl wood. Both the hatchet and the ground, both parts are from the same tree. I finished it by rubbing coats of Tung oil into it. Normally an axe could possibly be seen as an aggressive instrument with a single purpose- to split wood. However in this piece, I wanted to create this conceptual veil, where the axe is quiet, at peace and at one within the organic nature of its environment.

This sculpture, is carved out of Maple Burl wood. Both the hatchet and the ground, both parts are from the same tree. I finished it by rubbing coats of Tung oil into it. Normally an axe could possibly be seen as an aggressive instrument with a single purpose- to split wood. However in this piece, I wanted to create this conceptual veil, where the axe is quiet, at peace and at one within the organic nature of its environment.

KIN- is the root of my last name- which means ones family or relations. I wanted to personalize this work because the toolbelt I based it on was like a favorite piece of clothing for me, worn and formed to my hips. It is made completely of Mahogany wood and formed from three blocks. I used tightbond 3 wood glue and lots of clamps. This was a solid month of work doing nothing but this- for a deadline. Nothing like a deadline to crack the whip. I feel the metal hoop from the original pushed the realism aspect to just where I needed it. 

KIN- is the root of my last name- which means ones family or relations. I wanted to personalize this work because the toolbelt I based it on was like a favorite piece of clothing for me, worn and formed to my hips. It is made completely of Mahogany wood and formed from three blocks. I used tightbond 3 wood glue and lots of clamps. This was a solid month of work doing nothing but this- for a deadline. Nothing like a deadline to crack the whip. I feel the metal hoop from the original pushed the realism aspect to just where I needed it. 

To break up my art practice and be open I dive into other material and processes as well. I like to keep my ear to the ground and listen for new ideas. Here, I am charring a Mahogany lightning bolt over my backyard fire pit. I enjoyed surrendering my work to the fire. 

To break up my art practice and be open I dive into other material and processes as well. I like to keep my ear to the ground and listen for new ideas. Here, I am charring a Mahogany lightning bolt over my backyard fire pit. I enjoyed surrendering my work to the fire. 

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I lived in New York City from 1998 to 2003. During this time period, I created thousands of ink wash paintings. I used mostly fan brushes, Japanese Sumi ink, water and torn edged paper. Manhattan, with its light and grit was my studio and subject matter. 

I lived in New York City from 1998 to 2003. During this time period, I created thousands of ink wash paintings. I used mostly fan brushes, Japanese Sumi ink, water and torn edged paper. Manhattan, with its light and grit was my studio and subject matter. 

At times I would skate to various locations all over with a pack of materials. Sometimes, I just drifted, exploring, to return home at night. In this way Poet Bruna Mori and I met. Together we collaborated, creating the book, Derive. 

At times I would skate to various locations all over with a pack of materials. Sometimes, I just drifted, exploring, to return home at night. In this way Poet Bruna Mori and I met. Together we collaborated, creating the book, Derive

Beacon, NY 2006 In my studio, at the time, I was stretching three large canvases. I had tightened them around some heavy wooden stretcher bars that someone had given to me. Once finished, I found I didn’t want to paint on them. Until that point I had spent about three years experimenting with just about any material I could get to work on a flat surface. Some of it included this work. I was pouring large amounts of paint between large rolls of heavy paper and thin sheets of plastic.

Beacon, NY 2006 In my studio, at the time, I was stretching three large canvases. I had tightened them around some heavy wooden stretcher bars that someone had given to me. Once finished, I found I didn’t want to paint on them. Until that point I had spent about three years experimenting with just about any material I could get to work on a flat surface. Some of it included this work. I was pouring large amounts of paint between large rolls of heavy paper and thin sheets of plastic.

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 I started to take several trips to home depot.

 I started to take several trips to home depot.

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But now, in that moment standing there, having exhausted any interest to paint, I saw them as just large, flat, rectangular three dimensional objects. At the same time I started to notice the buckets I had kicking around the studio. What at first I saw as just functional objects, were now becoming stepping off points for new work. 

But now, in that moment standing there, having exhausted any interest to paint, I saw them as just large, flat, rectangular three dimensional objects. At the same time I started to notice the buckets I had kicking around the studio. What at first I saw as just functional objects, were now becoming stepping off points for new work. 

I would buy every variety I could find- steel ones too. I also used trash barrels for larger scale work. I disassembled them using utility knives and cutting shears. I cut out and shaped planks of wood to join and fit with the buckets, reassembling them as one. Because of how readily available they are and their cost I was able to make a lot of mistakes. The first one I made successfully was with plywood. Wood gives the new cylindrical forms the structure and tension needed to hold them in space. Other types followed- Maple, Ash, Black Walnut to name a few. This body of work continued on for three years and still does. One foot in reality and the other in abstraction. Meanwhile, I got hired on as a carpenter’s helper for a friend.

I would buy every variety I could find- steel ones too. I also used trash barrels for larger scale work. I disassembled them using utility knives and cutting shears. I cut out and shaped planks of wood to join and fit with the buckets, reassembling them as one. Because of how readily available they are and their cost I was able to make a lot of mistakes. The first one I made successfully was with plywood. Wood gives the new cylindrical forms the structure and tension needed to hold them in space. Other types followed- Maple, Ash, Black Walnut to name a few. This body of work continued on for three years and still does. One foot in reality and the other in abstraction. Meanwhile, I got hired on as a carpenter’s helper for a friend.

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A petroglyph at Three Rivers, dating back to between about 900 and 1400 AD. created by Jornada Mogollon people who used stone tools to remove the dark patina on the exterior of the rock.

A petroglyph at Three Rivers, dating back to between about 900 and 1400 AD. created by Jornada Mogollon people who used stone tools to remove the dark patina on the exterior of the rock.